Business Jets

A business jet is a type of jet aircraft and are often referred to as private jets, bizjet, corporate jet, VIP transport or executive jet (20092). The aircraft normally transport business people or other people with a lot of money. They can also be modified for other purposes such as express parcel deliveries, evacuation of casualties, or for public bodies such as government officials or armed forces (20092).

Who makes Business Jets?

There are a number of different manufacturers that make business jets throughout the world. Some of the main aircraft manufacturers of these smaller jet aircraft include:

  • Adam Aircraft Industries
  • Airbus
  • Boeing
  • Bombardier Aerospace
  • Cessna
  • Cirrus Design
  • Comp Air
  • Dassault
  • Diamond Aircraft Industries
  • Eclipse Aviation
  • Embraer
  • Epic Aircraft
  • Grob
  • Gulfstream
  • Hawker Beechcraft
  • Honda
  • Piper
  • Sino Swearingen
  • Spectrum

What types of Business Jets are there?

There are five general classes of business jets:

Heavy Jets – most expensive and biggest type of private jet designed for large capacity luxury air travel. Types of aircraft can include: Airbus (Airbus A319CJ & Airbus A380 Flying Palace), Boeing (Boeing Business Jet), and Embraer (Lineage 1000) (20092).
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Boeing 737 BBJ of the RAAF. (image embedded from Wikipedia on 24 October 2009)

Super Mid-size Jets – aircraft that feature a wide body cabin space, the ability to fly at high altitudes and fast speeds over a long range (20092). Types of aircraft can include: Bombardier Aerospace (Bombardier Challenger 850, Bombardier Global 5000 & Bombardier Global Express); Dassault (Dassault Falcon 7X, Dassault Falcon 900EX & Dassault Falcon 900DX); Embraer (Legacy 600); and Gulfstream (Gulfstream G350, Gulfstream G450, Gulfstream G500, Gulfstream G550 & Gulfstream G650) (20092).
Bombardier_Global_5000.jpg

Bombardier Global 5000. (image embedded from Wikipedia on 24 October 2009)

Mid-size Jets – long range aircraft which can fly transcontinental routes and can cater for larger passenger capacity (20092). Types of aircraft include: Bombardier Aerospace (Bombardier Challenger 300, Challenger 605, Learjet 60 XR & Learjet 85); Cessna (Citation Columbus, Citation X, Citation XLS & Citation Sovereign); Dassault (Dassault Falcon 50EX, Dassault Falcon 2000DX & Dassault Falcon 2000EX); Embraer (Embraer Legacy 450 & Embraer Legacy 500); Gulfstream (Gulfstream 150 & Gulfstream 200); and Hawker Beechcraft (Hawker 750, Hawker 850 XP, Hawker 900XP & Hawker 4000) (20092).
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Citation Sovereign. (image embedded from Wikipedia on 24 October 2009)

Light Jets – can fly into smaller airports which the larger business jets can not and they can fly at high speeds. Types of aircraft include: Bombardier Aerospace (Learjet 40, Learjet 40 XR, Learjet 45 & Learjet 45 XR); Cessna (Citation CJ1, Citation CJ2, Citation CJ3, Citation CJ4, Citation Bravo & Citation Encore); Embraer (Embraer Legacy 450 & Phenom 300); Grob (Grob SPn); Hawker Beechcraft (Beechcraft Premier I); & Sino Swearingen (SJ30-2) (20092).
Grob_Aircraft_SPn_D-CSPN.jpg

Grob G180 SPn at ILA 2006. (image embedded from Wikipedia on 24 October 2009)

Very Light Jets (VLJ) – also called Microjets are made to fly into small community airports and have a maximum takeoff weight of no more than 10,000Ib (20092). Types of aircraft include: Adam Aircraft Industries (Adam A700); Cessna (Citation Mustang); Cirrus Design (Cirrus Vision SF50); Comp Air (Comp Air Jet); Diamond Aircraft Industries (D-Jet); Eclipse Aviation (Eclipse 500 & Eclipse 400); Embraer (Phenom 100); Epic Aircraft (Epic Elite & Epic Victory); Honda (HondaJet); Piper (PiperJet); and Spectrum (Spectrum S-33 Independence) (20092).
HondaJet_001.jpg

HA-420 HondaJet. (image embedded from Wikipedia on 24 October 2009)

Who owns them?

The smaller aircraft namely the very light jets are generally used and owned by the air taxi industry (20092). The larger airliners are sometimes converted into luxury business jets and are either owned by a celebrity, wealthy businessmen or leased out by other charter companies. Business jets can be owned by anyone with a lot of money or hired from companies who own them, again for a considerable amount of money.

What makes a business jet different from a commercial aircraft?

The main difference between business jets and commercial aircraft is how it is outfitted inside the cabin. In a commercial aircraft the main focus is on passenger capacity and multiple classes of seating, whereas in a business jet more focus is put on luxuries and there is less seating available as that space is taken up by other amenities. In terms of luxury, in a business jet you can find a lot of the comforts that you would find at home. The amenities that are onboard a business jet depends on who is going to own the aircraft and consequently use it i.e. the clientele – in the case of charter airlines (20081). Some such luxury services or facilities can include: in-flight-catering; entertainment systems; first-class seating throughout the whole jet; showers; fax machines; meeting rooms; and even high-speed internet to name only a few possible facilities found onboard (20081).

Videos of Private Luxury Jets.

(Video embedded from YouTube on 24 October 2009) (Video embedded from YouTube on 24 October 2009)
References
1. BUSINESS JET TRAVELER (2008).. Inside the Cabin. Retrieved from Business Jet Traveler on 11 October 2009.
2. WIKIPEDIA (2009). Business Jets. Retrieved from Wikipedia on 11 October 2009.

Want to know more?

Aircraft Manufacturers
This AviationKnowledge page offers more information about the manufacturers of business jets.
Aircraft Manufacturers - AIRBUS
This AviationKnowledge page offers more information about Airbus, one of the aircraft manufacturers of business jets.
Aircraft Manufacturers - BOEING
This AviationKnowledge page offers more information about Boeing, one of the aircraft manufacturers of business jets.

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